Media History Project
mediahst@umn.edu

2000-2009 C.E.

  • 2000: Sony Playstation 2 uses DVD for home video games.
  • 2000: 40 million mobile wireless users worldwide, most in Europe, Asia.
  • 2000: Use of common office paper in U.S. rises almost 15% since 1995.
  • 2000: Report: most performed song of 20th century: "Happy Birthday."
  • 2000: "Y2K" bug tamed, but it was expensive.
  • 2000: On cable: Oxygen.
  • 2000: Microprocessors outdo Moore’s Law with Intel’s 1.5GHz.
  • 2000: Website created to ease public search of U.S. govt. locations.
  • 2000: "Beenz" issued as an online currency resembling trading stamps.
  • 2000: British "newscaster" Ananova joins virtual performers on TV, Net.
  • 2000: Stephen King’s novel Riding the Bullet is best seller via Net downloads only.
  • 2000: International Online Journalism Awards to be given annually.
  • 2000: The dot.com industry crashes.
  • 2000: Crusoe chip triples laptop battery life.
  • 2000: National Book Awards: Susan Sontag, Nathaniel Philbrick.
  • 2000: Queer As Folk on Showtime breaks ground.
  • 2000: Survivor begins TV reality show genre.
  • 2000: More than 3,000,000 blank CDs are sold every month.
  • 2000: School libraries challenged over "satanic" Harry Potter books.
  • 2000: One in four American adults hold college degrees.
  • 2000: FCC approves Viacom/CBS Merger.
  • 2000: 7 new Web domain names approved, including .info, .pro, .biz.
  • 2000: "Love Bug" virus infects 45 million computers worldwide.
  • 2000: Test IBM microprocessor uses molecule with five fluorine atoms.
  • 2000: 5.1 billion emails are sent in the U.S; 8.2 billion worldwide.
  • 2000: FCC authorizes low power, non-commercial FM radio stations.
  • 2000: Feature film Quantum Project is produced for Internet distribution, not theaters.
  • 2000: 3G (3rd generation) licenses sold for wireless internet.
  • 2000: Microchip inventor Jack Kilby wins Nobel Prize in Physics.
  • 2000: In Japan only, Internet cell phones are sold; 40,000 new subscribers daily.
  • 2000: Bluetooth lets computers converse via low power radio signals.
  • 2000: Microsoft gives the mouse an optical sensor.
  • 2000: From Japan, the camera-phone.
  • 2000: Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act becomes U.S. law.
  • 2000: U.S. government sets up website for official documents.
  • 2000: Reality TV shows like Survivor are big hits in U.S.
  • 2000: Queer as Folk breaks new TV ground.
  • 2000: Also on TV: Gilmore Girls, CSI, Curb Your Enthusiasm., Malcolm in the Middle.
  • 2000: Digital cameras cut deeply into analog camera sales.
  • 2000: Oscars (given 2001): Gladiator, Russell Crowe, Julia Roberts
  • 2000: Also at the movies: Traffic, Erin Brockovich, Chocolat.
  • 2000: Non-English language film Oscar: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon
  • 2000: 65% of all people in Finland own mobile phones, lead the world.
  • 2000: 9-minute video, George Lucas in Love, premieres on the Internet.
  • 2000: Japanese work on Internet-access glove, choker; downloaded talking ebook.
  • 2000: Supreme Court ends Personal Attack Rule, last vestige of Fairness Doctrine.
  • 2000: Court limits Napster’s Internet file-sharing of music.
  • 2000: Congress passes the Children’s Internet Protection Act.
  • 2000: Extremely rapid diffusion: 85% of U.S. households own VCRs.
  • 2000: U.S. Postal Service opens Internet postal store.
  • 2000: Nobel Prize in Literature: Gao Xingjian of China.
  • 2000: More than 3 million blank, recordable CDs are sold monthly.
  • 2000: More dollars spent on cable advertising than on TV broadcast ads.
  • 2000: DVD players become world’s fastest selling home electronics device.
  • 2000: Sony’s PlayStation 2.
  • 2000: Average American cable customer has a choice of 61 channels.
  • 2000: In U.S. alone: 100 million cell phone subscribers.
  • 2000: Seventy million computers connected to the Internet.
  • 2000: Singles spend $7 million for online dating services.
  • 2001: In U.S., FBI arrests Russian who cracked eBook encryption.
  • 2001: Stunned world watches television reports of 9/11; a few cheer.
  • 2001: The wireless laptop.

  • 2001: E-books on book-size electronic units have only modest success.
  • 2001: On cable: Hallmark, National Geographic, ABC Family.
  • 2001: Napster reaches a peak of 77 million users before shutdown.
  • 2001: Patriot Act allows examination of library, Internet use.
  • 2001: Waking Life, a film shot live, then converted into Roboscope animation.
  • 2001: Average American adult watches 4 hours of TV daily.
  • 2001: Americans spend more on electronic games than on movie tickets.
  • 2001: Movie box office receipts in U.S. climb to $8.4 billion.
  • 2001: From Harry Potter to Crouching Tiger, special effects rock audiences.
  • 2001: Intelsat becomes private company, not an inter-governmental organization.
  • 2001: Ixus digital camera produces color prints without computer.
  • 2001: Time names Albert Einstein the Person of the Century.
  • 2001: Satellite radio; XM begins broadcasting.
  • 2001: AT&T develops Natural Language Understanding: voice recognition.
  • 2001: Lara Croft, Tomb Raider, the movie.
  • 2001: iTunes.

  • 2001: Mac OS X operating system.

  • 2001: Apple opens a retail store.
  • 2001: An iPod can store 1,000 songs.

  • 2001: AnnaKournikova virus jams email boxes around the world.
  • 2001: Code Red and Nimda worms bring major damage to computer networks.
  • 2001: Azerbaijan switches from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet, angering Russians.
  • 2001: Much maligned TV newscasts receive praise for reports of New York terrorism.
  • 2001: Final Fantasy, a life-like, computer-generated feature film.
  • 2001: AT&T improves speech synthesizer, uses several languages.
  • 2001: Personal headsets display movies, video games, spreadsheets.
  • 2001: USB 2.0 connectors, will become computer standard.
  • 2001: Instant messaging, short messaging service (SMS), grows in popularity.
  • 2001: LexisNexis offers 2.8 billion searchable documents from 30,000 sources.
  • 2001: More than half of all Americans now use the Internet.
  • 2001: Mac OS X operating system.
  • 2001: On TV: Fear Factor, Alias, Scrubs, Reba, Smallville, 24, The Amazing Race.
  • 2001: A state, Nevada, legalizes online gambling.
  • 2001: Internet has thousands of online radio stations.
  • 2001: Nevada legalizes online gambling.
  • 2001: V.S. Naipaul, Trinidadian of Indian descent, wins Nobel Prize in Literature.
  • 2001: U.S. TV networks, magazines among targets of anthrax terrorists.
  • 2001: Oscars (given 2002): A Beautiful Mind, Denzel Washington, Halle Berry.
  • 2001: Also at the movies: Lord of the Rings, Gosford Park, Moulin Rouge, Shrek.
  • 2001: Non-English language film Oscar: No Man’s Land, Bosnia-Herzogovina.
  • 2001: Oscar category created: Best Animated Film. Feature Film Award.
  • 2001: From Microsoft: the Xbox game player.
  • 2001: Mamma Mia begins its long Broadway run.
  • 2001: National Book Awards: Jonathan Franzen, Andrew Solomon.
  • 2001: The Producers goes from movie (1967) to long Broadway run.
  • 2001: Six Feet Under joins HBO series.
  • 2002: A Wi-Fi-equipped laptop, the Tablet PC also recognizes writing.
  • 2002: "Googlewhacking" fad looks for odd word combinations in Internet sites.
  • 2002: On the Web, creators of online journals, or "web logs," now "blog on."
  • 2002: UK workers spend more time with email than with their children.
  • 2002: Politically Incorrect remark by Bill Maher leads to ABC cancellation.
  • 2002: Sirius follows XM as second satellite radio channel.
  • 2002: Comic book publishers join to publish views on 9/11 destruction.
  • 2002: Making DVDs become affordable to the average household.
  • 2002: Apple computer can create movies in DVD format.
  • 2002: On TV: American Idol, Monk, The Shield, Dr. Phil, Without a Trace.
  • 2002: MTV reportedly reaches 250 million homes worldwide.
  • 2002: Feature film, Attack of the Clones, produced entirely in digital format.
  • 2002: Hungarian Jewish Holocaust survivor Imre Kertész: Nobel Prize in Literature.
  • 2002: U.S. Supreme Court says 1996 Child Pornography Act is unconstitutional.
  • 2002: Pop-ups and pop-unders clutter computer screens.
  • 2002: Worldwide PC sales pass one-billion mark.
  • 2002: National Book Awards: Julia Glass, Robert Caro.
  • 2002: American Idol revives talent show genre.
  • 2002: Hairspray, the Broadway musical, starts a long run.
  • 2002: DVD burners are popular for downloading movies.
  • 2002: From England, roll-up screens for computers, television sets.
  • 2002: Cheap, hand-held computers are a big sales item.
  • 2002: Amazon.com stocks more than 350,000 titles.
  • 2002: Star Wars: Attack of the Clones, first big budget film shot with digital cameras.
  • 2002: Sony’s PlayStation2, Microsoft’s Xbox, Nintendo’s GameCube attract devotees.
  • 2002: "Klez" is the most destructive computer network worm yet.
  • 2002: DVD sales pass VCR sales; 40+ million U.S. homes have DVD.
  • 2002: Oscars (given 2003): Chicago, Adrien Brody, Nicole Kidman.
  • 2002: Also at the movies: Gangs of New York, The Pianist, The Hours, Adaptation.
  • 2002: Non-English language film Oscar: Nowhere in Africa, Germany.
  • 2002: Animated film Oscar: Spirited Away, Japan.
  • 2002: Documentary feature Oscar: Bowling for Columbine.
  • 2002: 70% of U.S. households could have broadband service; 15% use it.
  • 2002: Nearly 21,000 DVD titles in circulation, 7,000 introduced this year.
  • 2002: South Africa’s Sesame Street introduces an HIV-positive muppet.
  • 2002: Music industry earns $33 billion worldwide.
  • 2002: Estimated 100 million computer users have file sharing software.
  • 2002: Friendster sets up Internet social contact network.
  • 2002: Google News, an automated service without human editors.
  • 2003: Sales of recorded CDs drop 10% for a second year.
  • 2003: 239 million computer games are sold.
  • 2003: Auckland, New Zealand, has city-wide, high-speed wireless network.
  • 2003: MySpace.com.
  • 2003: Nobel Prize in Literature: John Coetzee, South African novelist, essayist.
  • 2003: Oscars (given 2004): The Lord of the Rings, Sean Penn, Charlize Theron.
  • 2003: Also at the movies: Pirates of the Caribbean, Mystic, Cold Mountain.
  • 2003: Non-English language film Oscar: The Barbarian Invasions, France.
  • 2003: Oscar for animated film: Finding Nemo.
  • 2003: From Apple Computer: the browser Safari.
  • 2003: On TV: Bill Maher, Ellen DeGeneris, Last Comic Standing, Nip/Tuck, Las Vegas.
  • 2003: A fifth of all Russians reportedly use cell phones.
  • 2003: DVD movie sales bring in more money than box offices.
  • 2003: Cell phones add computer and Internet capabilities.
  • 2003: Supreme Court mandates porn filters in federally funded public libraries.
  • 2003: Intelsat has more than 20 communication satellites in orbit.
  • 2003: Internet becomes integral part of political campaigning.
  • 2003: National Book Awards: Shirley Hazzard, Carlos Eire.
  • 2003: Embedded journalists report live from Iraq battles.
  • 2003: Wicked starts on Broadway, The Wizard of Oz witch gets her say.
  • 2003: Hollywood releases are heavy on special effects, violence, sequels.
  • 2003: U.S. law limits telemarketers by "Do not call" phone list.
  • 2003: On cable: Spike TV.
  • 2003: Apple’s G5 64-bit processor contains 58 million transistors.
  • 2003: Flash mobs, organized on the Net, start in New York, spread worldwide.
  • 2003: Destructive computer worms and viruses sharply increase.
  • 2003: The online iTunes Music Store offers tunes for 99 cents.
  • 2003: Some U.S. states tax Internet bandwidth.
  • 2003: Zip-Codes.com offers Zip-code information online.
  • 2003: Popularity of blogs increases sharply.
  • 2003: iTunes offers songs for 99 cents apiece.

  • 2003: Second Life offers a parallel universe.
  • 2003: The IP phone is a mini-computer that can transmit movies.
  • 2003: One-third of books bought in U.S. are romance novels.
  • 2003: Amazon.com scans texts of 120,000 books for Internet users.
  • 2003: An estimated one million camcorders worldwide.
  • 2003: Harry Potter books attacked as satanic, but also defended.
  • 2003: International piracy of films is rampant.
  • 2003: Dan Brown’s best seller, The Da Vinci Code.
  • 2003: Estimated 5 trillion unwanted messages set on the Internet.
  • 2003: A world summit on the Information Society meets in Switzerland.
  • 2003: European Union requires Internet companies to tax downloads.
  • 2003: World has 159 million cell phone users.
  • 2003: French Ministry of Culture bans the word "email." Wants "courriel."
  • 2003: Cost to business of computer viruses estimated at $55 billion.
  • 2003: Two AARP magazines far outstrip all others in circulation.
  • 2003: Cable TV offers TiVo-like features: storing, skipping commercials.
  • 2003: Intelsat has more than 20 communication satellites orbiting worldwide.
  • 2004: HD car radios go on sale.
  • 2004: Digital AM and FM signals with CD-quality.
  • 2004: 98% of all U..S. homes have color television.
  • 2004: Worldwide cell phone revenues surpass fixed-phone revenues.
  • 2004: Market grows for VOIP broadband Internet phone service.
  • 2004: Nobel Prize in Literature: Elfriede Jelinek, Austria novelist.
  • 2004: RCA sells 61-inch-wide TV sets 6.5 inches thick.
  • 2004: Survey lists cell phones as chief American love/hate object.
  • 2004: 2-D and 3-D photos taken by Rover vehicles beamed back from Mars.
  • 2004: Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ, sells tickets but angers many Jews.
  • 2004: FCC fines radio stations for obscene language on the air.
  • 2004: Google gets 138,000 requests a minute in 90 languages.
  • 2004: Three out of four Americans use the Internet.
  • 2004: Facebook makes friends.
  • 2004: Congress raises fines for TV indecency; considers action on TV violence.
  • 2004: 1 in 5 people under 30 say Internet is main information source.
  • 2004: Oldsters, minority groups reduce the "digital divide," go online.
  • 2004: $21 billion spent on online ads in U.S. alone.
  • 2004: The Polar Express uses sensors to convert live action to animation.
  • 2004: More U.S. information services are outsourced to India, elsewhere.
  • 2004: Survey: U.S. women spend more online game time than men, teens.
  • 2004: The iPod holds 10,000 tunes, but fits into a shirt pocket.
  • 2004: 95% of U.S. public libraries offer Internet access.
  • 2004: U.S. public library attendance up 17% in six years.
  • 2004: National Book Awards: Lily Tuck, Kevin Boyle.
  • 2004: : Jeopardy contestant Ken Jennings breaks records.
  • 2004: Janet Jackson's “wardrobe malfunction” on TV leads to national uproar.
  • 2004: The Sims 2 advances story games for computers.
  • 2004: Motion capture in The Polar Express shows animated version of actor.
  • 2004: Con artists use "phishing" to trick people to reveal personal data.
  • 2004: Wi-fi cell phone/cameras are replacing some computers.
  • 2004: 1.5 billion cell phones worldwide.
  • 2004: On TV: Deadwood, Trading Spouses, Lost, Desperate Housewives, Boston Legal.
  • 2004: Multi-million dollar mapping programs now cost less than $100.
  • 2004: University in San Diego offers degree in wireless communication.
  • 2004: London police use tiny, hidden wireless cameras to catch drug dealers.
  • 2004: Employers can use GPS tracking to see if service workers are on the job.
  • 2004: Apple wireless station plays iTunes over home stereo systems.
  • 2004: PDA sales fall sharply in favor of cool "smart" cell phones.
  • 2004: "Cabir," the first virus to infect cell phones, arrives via Bluetooth.
  • 2004: Violent video games Halo 2 and Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas sell millions.
  • 2004: Supreme Court rejects Internet porn ban as free speech violation.
  • 2004: Video games are 30 years old. Average age of player: 29.
  • 2004: More than half of all Americans play video games.
  • 2004: Oscars (given 2005): Million Dollar Baby, Jamie Foxx, Hilary Swank.
  • 2004: Also at the movies: The Aviator, Ray, Sideways, Finding Neverland.
  • 2004: Non-English language film Oscar: The Sea Inside, Spain.
  • 2004: Animation Oscar: The Incredibles.
  • 2004: "Podcasting" coined as term for Internet delivery of radio-style content
  • 2004: Google Gmail advances email service in many languages.

  • 2005: Cyber identity theft increases.
  • 2005: Chicken Little released as 3-D digital movie; shot at 144 fps.
  • 2005: Verizon buys MCI; SBC and AT&T connect.
  • 2005: 2 billion mobile phone customers worldwide.
  • 2005: Camera phones create instant citizen photojournalists.
  • 2005: Movie box office drops to 25 million tickets weekly; 36.000 screens.
  • 2005: Average U.S. homes can get 96.4 cable channels, but watch 15.4.
  • 2005: Two iPod Photo players combined as 3-D "stereopod."
  • 2005: National Book Awards: William Vollman, Joan Didion.
  • 2005: Wikipedia has 750,000 online encyclopedia articles in 50 languages.
  • 2005: Jersey Boys, a jukebox musical starts Broadway run.
  • 2005: Monty Python’s Spamalot gallops to Broadway.
  • 2005: Oscars (given 2006): Crash, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Reese Witherspoon.
  • 2005: Also at the movies: Brokeback Mountain, Syriana, Capote, Munich.
  • 2005: Non-English language film Oscar: Tsotsi, South Africa.
  • 2005: Animation Oscar: Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were Rabbit.
  • 2005: BPL (Broadband over Power Lines), emerges for Internet access.
  • 2005: YouTube post its first video.
  • 2005: 512 TV stations broadcast in digital high definition.
  • 2005: Cyberathletes win $1 million prize money in video game competition.
  • 2005: Nobel Prize in Literature: Harold Pinter, British playwright.
  • 2005: Newsweek criticized for photograph of Martha Stewart’s head on model’s body.
  • 2005: On TV: The Office (U.S. version), Colbert Report, Dancing with the Stars, Prison Break.
  • 2005: Episode of NBC’s Medium shot in 3-D.
  • 2006: "Kama Sutra" worm attacks computers seeking porn sites.
  • 2006: Muslims riot over cartoons of Mohammed in European press.
  • 2006: Western Union gets out of telegram business.
  • 2006: Chinese government builds "Great Firewall" to censor Internet.
  • 2006: Uproar over cell phone financial records available for sale.
  • 2006: An estimated 30 million readers of millions of blogs daily.
  • 2006: Google adds instant messaging; competes with AOL and Yahoo.
  • 2006: Da Vinci Code film stirs Christian religious anger.
  • 2006: Internet "telemedicine" allows doctors to see patients at a distance.
  • 2006: Blu-ray optical discs hold five times regular DVD storage.
  • 2006: Push email sends an alert when a letter arrives.
  • 2006: In Japan. keitai shosetsu, a novel written on a cell phone.
  • 2006: Deadline for broadcasters to be digital-only and surrender extra spectrum.
  • 2006: Estimated total hits to blogs each day: 30 million.
  • 2006: At CBS, Katie Couric is first principal female anchor of TV evening newscast.
  • 2006: TV networks place their most popular programs on the Web.
  • 2006: Viruses can infect Macs, considered almost immune until now.
  • 2006: Movie Bubble opens simultaneously in cinemas, on DVD, cable.
  • 2006: Skype Internet phone system reports 100 million customers.
  • 2006: From Shure, earphones that can be switched to pick up street noise.
  • 2006: Mac computers can run Windows XP operating system.
  • 2006: National Book Awards: Richard Powers, Timothy Egan.
  • 2006: Nobel Prize in Literature: Orhan Pamuk, Turkey.
  • 2006: Phone companies deliver video by IPTV (Internet Protocol Television).
  • 2006: Fold-up fabric contains wireless full-size keyboard for PDAs, phones.
  • 2006: High definition tapeless, digital memory camcorders on sale.
  • 2006: Hand-cranked $100 computer designed for developing country students.
  • 2006: World of Warcraft video game has 6 million online players worldwide.
  • 2006: More wi-fi hotspots; citywide hotspots planned.
  • 2006: On TV: Top Chef, The Unit, Ugly Betty, Friday Night Lights, Heroes .
  • 2006: Nintendo game controller responds to hand, body movements.
  • 2006: U.S. broadcasters face increased fines for programs deemed indecent.
  • 2006: Battle in Congress over "net neutrality" regarding website access.
  • 2006: John Updike’s novel, Terrorist.
  • 2006: Average American watches 4 hours 35 minutes of TV daily, a record.
  • 2006: Bill Gates decides to give up day-to-day control of Microsoft.
  • 2006: Video editing is done online; scenes can be "borrowed."
  • 2006: In Tokyo test, pointing a cell phone yields sightseeing information.
  • 2006: In U.S., woman buy most of the video games sold for mobile phones.
  • 2006: On TV, To Catch a Predator stings online sex prowlers.
  • 2006: Congress holds hearings on online safety concerns for children.
  • 2006: Study reports growing loneliness of Americans.
  • 2006: Sony Reader’s improved display revives interest in e-books.
  • 2006: UCLA brain research shows problems with studying while TV is on.
  • 2006: Espresso Book Machine offers cheap on-demand publishing.
  • 2006: Cell phones, iPods, and laptops considered terrorist detonation devices.
  • 2006: Number of drive-in theaters rises to 658.
  • 2006: In Mexico, archeologists find 3,000-year-old Olmec writing on stone slab.
  • 2006: 100 million websites with domain names and content.
  • 2006: Average American encounters an estimated 3,000 marketing messages daily.
  • 2006: Nintendo game Wii remote acts like a magic wand. that players wave.
  • 2006: In a year and a half, YouTube posts 100 million videos; adds 70,000 daily.
  • 2006: DirecTV experiment lets viewers choose baseball game camera angles.
  • 2006: Hundreds of millions of dollars paid for MySpace.com and YouTube.com.
  • 2006: Oscars (given 2007): The Departed, Forest Whitaker, Helen Mirren.
  • 2006: Also at the movies: Babel, Letters from Iwo Jima, The Queen, Little Miss Sunshine.
  • 2006: Animation Oscar: Happy Feet.
  • 2006: Ex-Vice President Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth on global warming wins Oscar.
  • 2006: Foreign language film: The Lives of Others, Germany.
  • 2006: Gold Rush, a television-style reality quiz show on the Internet.
  • 2006: Image Metrics’ animated figures mimic emotions on actors’ faces.
  • 2006: Time Person of the Year: You, for taking control of your media.
  • 2007: iPhone surfs Web, emails, plays videos, iTunes, makes phone calls, takes pictures.
  • 2007: Mobile TV service for cell phones builds a customer base.
  • 2007: Wikileak.org, an open-source site for government documents.
  • 2007: Nielsen research reports that rich, poor watch different TV shows.
  • 2007: U.S. women spend two more hours with video games than they did a year ago.
  • 2007: Of video game players, more are adult women (30%) than boys under 18 (23%).
  • 2007: Another computer worm: W32.Rinbot.H.
  • 2007: Cell phone can now tune into television programs.
  • 2007: Average American cable customer watches 15% of a choice of 104 channels.
  • 2007: More than 700 U.S. radio stations have converted to HD.
  • 2007: Internet oversight agency rejects proposal for .xxx porn site designation.
  • 2007: On TV: Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader?
  • 2007: Pakistani cleric threatens suicide bombing to support anti-smut campaign.
  • 2007: Students email, blog on MySpace.com during massacre at Virginia Tech.
  • 2007: Radio, TV talk show host Don Imus fired over insensitive comment.
  • 2007: FCC asks Congress for power to regulate TV violence.
  • 2007: More than six million “residents” of Second Life.

  • 2007: Oscars (given 2008): No Country for Old Men, Daniel Day Lewis, Marion Cotillard.

  • 2007: Also at the movies: There Will Be Blood, The Bourne Ultimatum, Sweeney Todd.

  • 2007: Non-English language film Oscar (given 2008): The Counterfeitors, Austria.

  • 2007: Oscar (given 2008) for animated film: Ratatouille.

  • 2007: Nobel Prize in Literature: Doris Lessing, United Kingdom.

  • 2007: A.M.A. decides it’s not ready to call excessive video game play an “addiction.”
  • 2007: Last 20 minutes of Harry Potter film available in 3-D at IMAX theaters.
  • 2007: China combats online game addiction; cuts points in half after three hours play.
  • 2007: The last of the seven-volume Harry Potter series is published.
  • 2007: National Book Awards: Denis Johnson, Tim Weiner.
  • 2007: CNN and YouTube sponsor Web 2.0-style political debate.
  • 2007: Nation of Estonia is nearly shut down by botnet attack. Web War One?
  • 2007: Teenage hacker breaks iPhone code within months of its release.
  • 2007: IBM researches a way to store data on a single atom.
  • 2007: Fred Thompson presidential candidacy halts Law & Order TV reruns.
  • 2007: 17-year-old Ashley Qualls earns millions via MySpace.com business.
  • 2007: Netflix has 6.7 million subscribers for online movie rentals.
  • 2007: Sony’s 11-inch OLED TV screen is thinner than a dime.
  • 2007: The Storm Worm virus is the trickiest one yet.
  • 2007: Amazon’s Kindle, an automated reading device.

  • 2007: China denies accusations of organized hacker attacks.

  • 2007: Lots of teens want to be Guitar Heroes.

  • 2007: Survey: 27% of Americans did not read any books in past year.

  • 2007: Survey: 27% of Americans read at least 15 books in past year.

  • 2008: Cheap “survival” radio has crank, solar charger.

  • 2008: Israeli eyeglasses beam email, movies directly to the eye.

  • 2008: Young Japanese women (mostly) write texting novels on cellphones.

  • 2008: BookSnap points the way to affordable, fast book scanners.

  • 2008: Embarrassed by Googles about you? Effects can be reduced.

  • 2008: After 60 years, Polaroid instant film falls victim to digital photography.

  • 2008: Sony streams major movie directly to Internet-connected TV.

  • 2008: iPhone 3G adds many new features.

  • 2008: YouTube plays a significant role in presidential election.

  • 2008: Hulu.com offers free movies on computer screens; ad support.

  • 2008: Camcorder recording one hour of HD video weighs 3.3 oz.

  • 2008: Plastic Logic Reader, a large, flexible electronic reading device.

  • 2008: CBS has another “wardrobe malfunction,” this time in a Survivor episode.

  • 2008: “Guitar Hero” series gets a lot of play on imaginary instruments.

  • 2008: In Egypt, political activists use Facebook to rally for democracy.

  • 2008: Internet plays important part in U.S. presidential election victory.

  • 2008: IBM supercomputer breaks petaflop: 1 quadrillion calculations/sec.

  • 2008: Memristor allows computers to be instant-on, like light bulbs.

  • 2008: Cheap, thin-film solar panels roll out as if from printing press.

  • 2008: CNN reporter appears on election night set as a hologram.

  • 2008: Power-hungry, hot Net servers may be placed in the ocean.

  • 2008: Touch Sight camera provides images for the blind.

  • 2008: Better, cheaper cameras can shoot video or stills.

  • 2008: Oscars: (given 2009): Slumdog Millionaire, Sean Penn, Kate Winslet.
  • 2008: Also at the movies: Milk, The Wrestler, The Reader, …Benjamin Button.
  • 2008: Animation Oscar: WALL-E.
  • 2008: Foreign language film: Departures, Japan.
  • 2008: Best documentary: Man on Wire.
  • 2009: iPhone acquires more than 10,000 apps.
  • 2009: NY Times breaks 157-year tradition: runs a display ad on page 1.
  • 2009: Major U.S. newspapers face bankruptcy as readers, income erode.
  • 2009: Blu-ray beats HD-DVD for next generation home movie viewing.

  • 2009: Parents squirm when Dora the Explorer is made sexier.

  • 2009: Vook, a digital reader with video segments inside a book.

  • 2009: Microsoft launches Windows 7 to replace criticized Windows Vista.

  • 2009: “Cloud computing” moves to central data storage, away from PCs.